Visual Arts

No More Free Space? The Singapore Pavilion Returns from Venice

Organised by: Singapore University of Technology and Design, National University of Singapore. Commissioned by: DesignSingapore Council, Urban Redevelopment AuthorityPlease
  • Date:
    18 May - 30 Jun 2019
  • Time:
    9:00am - 9:00pm daily
  • Venue:
    National Design Centre, Atrium, 111 Middle Road Singapore 188969
    National Design Centre, Atrium, 111 Middle Road Singapore 188969National Design Centre, Atrium, 111 Middle Road Singapore 188969
  • Admission:
    Free

Synopsis:

No More Free Space? tells the story of how, despite the lack of free space, Singapore-based architects, urban planners and place-makers have creatively found ways to bring delightful free spaces to the city's everyday life.

The exhibition, which marks the country's sixth showcase at the International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, since 2004, returns to Singapore come 18th May.

The exhibition celebrates how architects and planners have innovated and borrowed from nature to create useful and delightful spaces and places. Set against the backdrop of Singapore's compact urban environment, the exhibition features 12 Singapore-based projects that showcase the resourcefulness of the architects, their inspirations and the realisation of ideas, while borrowing natural resources such as light, air, greenery and water.

Each of the 12 projects featured shows imagination, openness, discovery and resolution to turn constraints into possibilities. The projects also tap into social capital in order to bring joy and connect people to the larger community.

The Pavilion's centrepiece features an immersive installation, an ethereal cloud made of skilfully handcrafted acrylic knots gently suspended in the vast spaces of the Sale d'Armi – a venue provided by the National Arts Council. Complete with a multi-sensory projection of lights, sounds and images of Singapore, the pavilion invites visitors to immerse themselves in the spaces within the cloud and enjoy the multi-sensorial installation – in itself an example of a resourceful, unexpected free space.

No More Free Space? The Singapore Pavilion Returns from Venice


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